Ostrich (Struthio camelus)
Birds

Ostrich (Struthio camelus)

Kingdom of the Wild

Area:
Africa, and has been introduced to southern Australia
Status:
Least concern
Quick Fact:

The ostrich is the only bird to have just 2 toes, one of which has a formidable 10 cm long claw!

African Crowned Crane (Balearica regulorum gibbericeps)
Birds

African Crowned Crane (Balearica regulorum gibbericeps)

Kingdom of the Wild

Area:
East Africa
Status:
Endangaered
Quick Fact:

The Crowned cranes are recognisable from the stiff golden feathers which is on the top of their head

Rainbow Lorikeets (Trichoglossus moluccanus)
Birds

Rainbow Lorikeets (Trichoglossus moluccanus)

Australian Rainbows

Area:
Australia
Status:
Least concern
Quick Fact:

The Rainbow Lorikeet mostly forages on the flowers of shrubs or trees to harvest nectar and pollen, but also eats fruits, seeds and some insects.

They are often seen in loud and fast-moving flocks.

Chilean Flamingos (Phoenicopterus Chilensis)
Birds

Chilean Flamingos (Phoenicopterus Chilensis)

Otter Creek

Area:
South America
Status:
Near Threatened
Quick Fact:

Flamingos have bristtle-like tongues to filter water and food.

Their pink feathers come from the pigments in their diet.

Ruppell’s Griffon Vulture (Gyps rueppellii)
Birds

Ruppell’s Griffon Vulture (Gyps rueppellii)

Vulture Valley

Area:
Sub-Saharan Africa
Status:
Critically endangered
Quick Fact:

Vultures have bald heads to stop them getting dirty whilst eating!

Griffons can consume more than 3 pounds of meat in 4 to 5 minutes.

Andean Condor (Vultur gryphus)
Birds

Andean Condor (Vultur gryphus)

World of Wings

Area:
The high Andes and the shores of the Peruvian coast
Status:
Near threatened, listed on Appendix I of CITES and listed on Appendix II of the Convention on Migratory Species (CMS)
Quick Fact:

As one of the largest flying birds in the world, as it soars gracefully on huge, motionless wings.

Like many birds of prey they spend a lot of time soaring around searching for food. If one condor drops to the ground after spotting a carcass others will follow to investigate, leading to old beliefs that the birds were telepathic.

Great Grey Owl (Strix nebulosa)
Birds

Great Grey Owl (Strix nebulosa)

World of Wings

Area:
Alaska, Canada, North America, North Europe and Asia
Status:
Least concern and listed on Appendix II of CITES
Quick Fact:

The great grey owl is one of the world's most instantly recognisable birds of prey. The great grey owl is almost all feathers for insulation, underneath its body is no bigger than a tawny owl.

 

 

 

Humboldt Penguin (Spheniscus humboldti)
Birds

Humboldt Penguin (Spheniscus humboldti)

Penguin Shores

Area:
Peru and Chile and islands off the west coast of South America
Status:
Vulnerable, listed on Appendix I of CITES
Encounter:
11:30 & 15:00
Quick Fact:

Humboldt Penguins are monogamous, meaning they only have one partner through their breeding life.

All of the penguins have individual patterns of spots on their chest and their own characters, they are also tagged for identification.

Penguin encounters take place at Inca Trail.

See what penguins you can identify during your next visit!

King Vulture (Sarcoramphus papa)
Birds

King Vulture (Sarcoramphus papa)

World of Wings

Area:
Central America, south as far as southern Brazil
Status:
Least concern and listed on Appendix III of CITES
Quick Fact:

Like most vultures, king vultures have a bald head to stop any feathers getting dirty whilst they are eating which also prevents a build up of bacteria.

King vultures are believed to mate for live, which can be around 30 years in the wild.

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Rhinoceros Hornbill (Buceros rhinoceros)
Birds

Rhinoceros Hornbill (Buceros rhinoceros)

Wilds of Asia

Area:
Brunei Darussalam; Indonesia; Malaysia; Thailand
Status:
Near Threatened and Appendix II of CITES.
Quick Fact:

The Rhinoceros Hornbill has a prominent golden-yellow horn, called a casque, on the top of its beak. The casque is a hollow structure made up of keratin (the same material as human fingernails) and acts as a resonating chamber, amplifying the bird’s calls.

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