Pygmy Hippopotamus (Choeropsis liberiensis)
Mammals

Pygmy Hippopotamus (Choeropsis liberiensis)

Kingdom of the Wild

Area:
Western Africa, Liberia, Ivory Coast, Sierra Leone.
Status:
Endangered and listed on Appendix II of CITES.
Quick Fact:

The pygmy hippopotamus spends the day in water, and emerges when they are hungry and will feed on fruits, leaves, roots and grasses

Maneless Zebra (Equus burchelli bohmi)
Mammals

Maneless Zebra (Equus burchelli bohmi)

Kingdom of the Wild

Area:
southern Sudan and southern Ethiopia, south along eastern Africa, as far as Zambia, Mozambique and Malawi, before spreading into most southern African countries.
Status:
Near Threatened
Quick Fact:

Each zebra has a unique stripe pattern that can be recognised by other family members!

Black and white colobus monkeys
Mammals

Black and white colobus monkeys

Out of Africa

Area:
Central Africa
Status:
Classified as Vulnerable by the IUCN Red List
Quick Fact:

They are quite unusual in that they have lost their thumbs and generally have only four fingers on their hands. Some individuals will have a partial thumb that is not used.

Patagonian Sea Lion (Otaria flavescens)
Mammals

Patagonian Sea Lion (Otaria flavescens)

Playa Patagonia

Area:
Coasts of South America.
Status:
Least concern
Encounter:
12.00, 14.00 & 15.30
Quick Fact:

Sealions use their fore and hind limbs for “walking” on the land and mainly use their front flippers for swimming.

L’hoest Monkey (Cercopithecus lhoesti)
Mammals

L’hoest Monkey (Cercopithecus lhoesti)

Edge of Africa

Area:
Republic of Congo, Western Uganda
Status:
Vulnerable
Quick Fact:

L'hoest monkeys have a white ruff that frames the face with distinctive deep set orange eyes. Their bodies are black and have long legs which are grizzled with grey. They have a chestnut coloured “saddle” at the base of their back.

Goats and Sheep
Mammals

Goats and Sheep

Familiar Friends

Area:
Africa
Status:
Not listed
Quick Fact:

Cameron Sheep have short, fine hair which allows them to keep cool in the African heat.

Pygmy goats are great climbers, browsing on leaves and young branches in the trees.

Hunting Dogs (Lycaon pictus)
Mammals

Hunting Dogs (Lycaon pictus)

Dragons of Komodo

Area:
Southern and Eastern Africa
Status:
Endangaered
Quick Fact:

Hunting dogs, also known as painted dogs each have their own unique coat pattern, with big round ears. Unlike other dogs hunting dogs only have only four toes per foot.

Hunting dogs are threatened by shrinking space to roam in their African home. They are also quite susceptible to diseases spread by domestic animals.

Horses and Donkeys
Mammals

Horses and Donkeys

Familiar Friends

Status:
Not listed
Quick Fact:

Here at Colchester Zoo we have a number of horses and donkeys that rotate from their stable to their field.

All of our horses are rescues from the World Horse Welfare who rehome horses with us who enjoy human interaction.

There are more than 300 breeds of horse developed for many different uses.

A male donkey is called a Jack, and a female is called a Jenny or Jennet.

Alpacas and Llamas
Mammals

Alpacas and Llamas

Familiar Friends

Status:
Not listed
Quick Fact:

Here at Colchester Zoo we have a number of alpacas and llamas that live together in harmony. Though they are often mistaken as each they the most distinguishing physical difference is their size, their hair and face shape.

 

 

Fennec Fox (Vulpes zerda)
Mammals

Fennec Fox (Vulpes zerda)

Lion Rock

Area:
Northern Africa
Status:
Least concern
Quick Fact:

A fully grown fennec fox only weighs around 1kg and they are the smallest of all the foxes.

The fennec fox's unusually large ears, which can be up to 15cm long, are an adaptation to help them lose heat in the hot desert and to help locate their prey.

KuneKune Pigs
Mammals

KuneKune Pigs

Familiar Friends

Area:
New Zealand
Status:
Not listed
Quick Fact:

KuneKune pigs are found living in the grasslands and bush of New Zealand.

They have a very placid nature and love human contact.

KuneKune pigs are very hairy, have short legs and round bodies.

Pied Tamarin (Saguinus bicolor)
Mammals

Pied Tamarin (Saguinus bicolor)

Worlds Apart

Area:
South America
Status:
Endangaered
Quick Fact:

These small monkeys have a body length that ranges between 20-28 cm, a tail that measures between 33 and 42 cm and an average weight of 430 grams.

Tamarins are highly social and live in a family-like structure in the tropical forests

Linne’s two toed sloth (choloepus didactylus)
Mammals

Linne’s two toed sloth (choloepus didactylus)

Worlds Apart

Area:
Central and South America
Status:
Least concern
Quick Fact:

Sloths are one of the slowest animals in the world, as their leafy diet doesn't provide much energy!

Sloths spend most of their time hanging upside down in the forest canopy.

Golden-Headed Lion Tamarin ( Leontopithecus chrysolmlas)
Mammals

Golden-Headed Lion Tamarin ( Leontopithecus chrysolmlas)

Worlds Apart

Area:
Brazil
Status:
Endangaered
Quick Fact:

Golden-headed lion tamarins stick their tongues out at intruders to scare them away.

Coppery Titi Monkey (Callicebus cupreus)
Mammals

Coppery Titi Monkey (Callicebus cupreus)

Worlds Apart

Area:
Brazil and Peru
Status:
Least concern
Quick Fact:

Coppery Titi monkeys intertwine they're tails when their sleeping.

Southern Tamandua (Tamandua tetradactyla)
Mammals

Southern Tamandua (Tamandua tetradactyla)

Worlds Apart

Area:
South America
Status:
Least concern
Quick Fact:

Tamanduas are known as "stinkers of the forest" by local people due to the fact the leave scent trails to mark their territory!

Tamanduas have a 40cm long, sticky tongue which is perfect for licking up ants and termites.

Giant Anteater (Myrmecophaga tridactyla)
Mammals

Giant Anteater (Myrmecophaga tridactyla)

Wilds of Asia

Area:
Central and South America
Status:
Vulnerable
Quick Fact:

When collecting insects, an anteater's tongue can flick up to 150 times per minute, eating up to 30,000 ants per day!

Anteaters are almost blind, but have a keen sense of smell.

Black and White Ruffed Lemur ( Varecia verigata variegata)
Mammals

Black and White Ruffed Lemur ( Varecia verigata variegata)

Lost Madagascar

Area:
Madagascar
Status:
Critically endangered
Quick Fact:

In groups, black and white ruffed lemurs produce a chorus of deep, barking, alarm calls, and a wailing howl when defending their territories.

Binturong (Arctictis binturong)
Mammals

Binturong (Arctictis binturong)

Wilds of Asia

Area:
South East Asia
Status:
Vulnerable
Quick Fact:

Binturongs mark their territory by leaving a musky substance that smells like popcorn!

Gelada Baboon (Theropithecus gelada)
Mammals

Gelada Baboon (Theropithecus gelada)

Gelada Bridge

Area:
Central Etheopia
Status:
Near Threatened
Quick Fact:

The gelada baboons are the last surviving species of grass-grazing primates, spending ,most of their time on the ground and rarely climbing trees.

Kirk’s Dik-Dik (Madoqua Kirkii)
Mammals

Kirk’s Dik-Dik (Madoqua Kirkii)

Edge of Africa

Area:
Eastern Africa
Status:
Least concern
Quick Fact:

The dik-dik is one of the smallest members of the antelope family measuring a maximum of 45cm high.

Blue Duiker (Philantomba monticola)
Mammals

Blue Duiker (Philantomba monticola)

Edge of Africa

Area:
Central, Eastern and Southern Africa
Status:
Least concern
Quick Fact:

The blue duiker gets its name from the bluish hairs on its back. Duiker is a Dutch Afrikaans word, meaning to dive, referring to the duiker’s tendency to dive into dense cover when startled.

Reticulated Giraffe (Giraffa camelopardalis reticulata)
Mammals

Reticulated Giraffe (Giraffa camelopardalis reticulata)

Kingdom of the Wild

Area:
Northeastern Kenya
Status:
Least concern
Encounter:
12:15 & 14:15
Quick Fact:

With their 45-centimetre prehensile, black tongue the giraffe can eat up to 134 kilograms of leaves a day! We have a group of pure-bred reticulated giraffes, all females.

Don't miss the daily feed times where you can get the unique opportunity to hand feed the giraffes yourself!

Southern White Rhinoceros (Ceratotherium simum simum)
Mammals

Southern White Rhinoceros (Ceratotherium simum simum)

Kingdom of the Wild

Area:
South and northeast Africa
Status:
Near Threatened and listed on Apppendix I of CITES
Quick Fact:

The white rhinoceros is the largest of the five rhinoceros’ species and one of the world’s biggest land animals. We have a group of five White Rhinos; three females and two males. Our group of Rhinos are part of the ESB breeding programme

Colchester Zoo's charity, Action for the Wild supports rhino conservation in South Africa raising funds for the equipment need to protect both white and black rhinos.

Aardvark  (Orycteropus afer)
Mammals

Aardvark (Orycteropus afer)

Aardvark Burrows

Area:
Southern Egypt to South Africa
Status:
Least concern
Quick Fact:

Our group of aardvarks are one of the most successful breeding group of aardvarks in the UK with 9 offspring born since 2007!

As aardvarks are nocturnal you may not be able to spot them outside, so make sure to step inside the burrow to see the group curled up inside!

African Elephant (Loxodonta africana)
Mammals

African Elephant (Loxodonta africana)

Elephant Kingdom

Area:
Africa south of the Sahara
Status:
Vulnerable and listed on Appendix II on the Convention on Migratory Species (CMS or Bonn Convention). Listed in Appendix I of CITES in 1989, but the populations of the following Range States have since been transferred back to Appendix II: Botswana (1997), Namibia (1997), South Africa (2000) and Zimbabwe (1997)
Encounter:
12:30 & 14:30
Quick Fact:

The largest recorded African elephant weighed an impressive ten tonnes. The African elephant’s brain is bigger than that of any other animal with the skull making up 25% of its body weight.

Don't miss the daily feed times where you can get the unique opportunity to hand feed the elephants yourself!

Bennett’s Wallaby (Macropus rufogriseus)
Mammals

Bennett’s Wallaby (Macropus rufogriseus)

Wallaby Walkabout

Area:
Coastal forests of eastern and southeastern Australia, common in Queensland, northeastern New South Wales and Tasmania
Status:
Least concern
Quick Fact:

Wallabies are best known for hopping; however, they can also crawl and swim!

Our wallabies are very friendly, often stopping to sunbathe on the paths and inspect any passing visitors!

Chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes)
Mammals

Chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes)

Chimpanzee Lookout

Area:
Guinea and Ghana in West Africa, across to Tanzania in the east
Status:
Endangered and listed on Appendix I of CITES
Encounter:
13:00 & 15:15
Quick Fact:

The chimpanzee is one of our closet living relatives and is estimated to share 98 percent of our genes.

Grey Wolf (Canis lupus)
Mammals

Grey Wolf (Canis lupus)

Call of the Wild

Area:
Canada, Eastern Russia, and parts of the US and Europe.
Status:
Least concern and listed on Appendix II of CITES, except for populations from Bhutan, Nepal, India and Pakistan, which are listed on Appendix I.
Encounter:
12:30
Quick Fact:

The grey wolf is the largest wild canid, or member of the 'dog' family. Grey wolves are social animals and the ancestor of all domestic dogs. In the wild they live in packs of 5–10 individuals and have a highly organised social structure.

 

 

Lion-Tailed Macaque (Macaca silenus)
Mammals

Lion-Tailed Macaque (Macaca silenus)

Wilds of Asia

Area:
The Ghat Mountains of south-west India.
Status:
Endangered and listed on Appendix I of CITES
Quick Fact:

The lion-tailed macaques name comes from its long tail, which has a tassel at the end like that of a lion.

Mandrill (Mandrillus sphinx)
Mammals

Mandrill (Mandrillus sphinx)

Edge of Africa

Area:
Western Africa including South Cameroon and Gabon
Status:
Vulnerable and listed on Appendix I of CITES.
Quick Fact:

The mandrill is not only the largest monkey in the world, but it is also one of the most distinctive, with their extremely striking face, with a red stripe down the nose and blue flanges framing it.

Our mandrill troop at Colchester Zoo have a very successful breeding record, with offspring born yearly.

 

Orangutan (Pongo pygmaeus)
Mammals

Orangutan (Pongo pygmaeus)

Orangutan Forest

Area:
Borneo
Status:
Endangered and listed on Appendix I of CITES
Encounter:
12:15 & 14:30
Quick Fact:

Orangutan means 'person of the forest'

Orangutans are extremely endangered in the wild. The main reason is that their rainforest home is being cut down to make way for palm oil plantations. This is a very high profit crop and it is thought that 10% of all supermarket products contain it. This is causing severe habitat loss, which is causing the dramatic depletion in orangutan numbers.

Patas Monkey (Erythrocebus patas)
Mammals

Patas Monkey (Erythrocebus patas)

Out of Africa

Area:
Senegal, east to Ethiopia and south to Tanzania.
Status:
Least concern and listed on Appendix II of CITES.
Quick Fact:

Patas monkeys are one of the fastest primates in the world and can run at speeds of 50 kmph.

Philippine Spotted Deer (Rusa alfredi)
Mammals

Philippine Spotted Deer (Rusa alfredi)

Island Dwellers

Area:
The islands of Negros and Panay in the Philippines
Status:
Endangered
Quick Fact:

The Philippine spotted deer is also known as Visayan spotted deer and it is thought that they are mainly nocturnal, emerging at dusk to look for food.

Pileated gibbon (Hylobates pileatus)
Mammals

Pileated gibbon (Hylobates pileatus)

Wilds of Asia

Area:
Cambodia, Laos and south-east Thailand
Status:
Endangered on the IUCN Red List and listed on Appendix I of CITES
Quick Fact:

The Pileated gibbons live in socially monogamous pairs so the male and a female live together and rear their offspring together.

Red panda (Ailurus fulgens)
Mammals

Red panda (Ailurus fulgens)

Wilds of Asia

Area:
Himalayas from Nepal to Assam
Status:
Endangered and listed on Appendix I of CITES
Encounter:
11:00
Quick Fact:

Our breeding pair of red pandas are housed in an open air enclosure with a number of different platforms and plenty of space for them to climb and explore.  The enclosure has plenty of bamboo for our individuals to enjoy, as this makes up 95% of their diet in the wild. Bamboo is highly nutritous and red pandas may spend up to 13 hours foraging for this food source as well as consuming 200,000 bamboo leaves a day.

Red River Hog (Potamochoerus porcus)
Mammals

Red River Hog (Potamochoerus porcus)

Edge of Africa

Area:
West and central sub Saharan Africa to northern South Africa and Madagascar.
Status:
Least concern
Quick Fact:

Instantly recognisable for its bright rufous fur, the red river hog is undoubtedly the most strikingly coloured of all wild pigs

We have a group of red river hogs here at Colchester Zoo. These wild species of pig are also known as bushpigs. They have a bristly coat, which can vary from reddish to greyish-brown, and they have a white mane running down their backs. They also have 2 overgrown teeth which protrude out of their mouths as tusks.

Red-bellied Lemur (Eulemur rubriventer)
Mammals

Red-bellied Lemur (Eulemur rubriventer)

Lost Madagascar

Area:
Eastern Madagascar
Status:
Vulnerable and listed on Appendix I of CITES.
Quick Fact:

Red-bellied lemurs are cathemeral, which means they may be active during the day or night.

Our small group of red-bellied Lemurs can be seen in the Lost Madagascar exhibit, foraging for food and sunbathing!

Ring-tailed Lemur (Lemur catta)
Mammals

Ring-tailed Lemur (Lemur catta)

Lost Madagascar

Area:
South West Madagascar
Status:
Near Threatened and listed on Appendix I of CITES
Quick Fact:

We have a successful breeding group of Ring-tailed Lemurs that are part of an EEP breeding programme.

Male ring-tailed lemurs compete for females via ‘stink fights’, smearing scent on their tails and wafting the smell towards their opponent.

Slender Tailed Meerkat (Suricata suricata)
Mammals

Slender Tailed Meerkat (Suricata suricata)

Suricata Sands

Area:
Southern Africa including Angola, Namibia and South Africa
Status:
Least concern
Quick Fact:

Meerkats communicate by using a variety of calls to signal certain situations such as being lost, alarm calls, pup feeding calls, guarding calls and foraging calls.

Smooth-coated otters (Lutrogale perspicillata)
Mammals

Smooth-coated otters (Lutrogale perspicillata)

Otter Creek

Area:
Southern and Southeast Asia, India, and China
Status:
Vulnerable and listed on Appendix II of CITES
Encounter:
14:30
Quick Fact:

Smooth coated otters love being in water and use all four paws to ‘doggy paddle’

 

Spotted Hyena (Crocuta crocuta)
Mammals

Spotted Hyena (Crocuta crocuta)

Edge of Africa

Area:
Found throughout sub-Saharan Africa with the exception of the Congo rainforests and the far south
Status:
Least concern
Encounter:
15:00
Quick Fact:

We have had previous successful births with our spotted hyena and hope to be able to help maintain the population of this species within the captive environment.

Sun Bear (Helarctos malayanus)
Mammals

Sun Bear (Helarctos malayanus)

Bears of the Rising Sun

Area:
South-eastern Asia, the Malay Peninsula, Sumatra and Borneo
Status:
Vulnerable and listed on Appendix I of CITES
Quick Fact:

The sun bear, also known as the dog bear or honey bear, after its love of honey, is the smallest of the eight bear species. It is black with a golden crescent marking on its chest which, in ancient Eastern folklore, represents the sun.

Visayan Warty Pig (Sus cebifrons)
Mammals

Visayan Warty Pig (Sus cebifrons)

Island Dwellers

Area:
The islands of Negros and Panay in the Philippines.
Status:
Critically Endangered
Quick Fact:

The Visayan warty pig is a dark grey colour, and the body is lightly covered with bristly hairs.  There is a tuft of hair in between the ears and like all pigs, the face is long and ends with a round nasal disc

Warthog (Phacochoerus africanus)
Mammals

Warthog (Phacochoerus africanus)

Edge of Africa

Area:
Central, eastern and southern Africa, south of the Sahara desert.
Status:
Least concern
Quick Fact:

We have a group of warthogs living within their enclosure at Edge of Africa.

The warthog gets its name from the warts on its face and these warts help to protect the face and eyes from an opponent's tusks when fighting.

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