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Our Wilds of Asia section is home to many rare and endangered Asian species with indoor and outdoor viewing available across of a range of different animals from Red pandas to our Burmese python.

As you walk around the outdoor viewing areas, you will come across endangered Red pandas, our family of Asian short-clawed otters and the binturong, also known as the bearcat.

Our Wilds of Asia indoor walkthrough exhibit also houses several species, from the small and scaly to the large and fluffy. You can watch in awe as our magnificent Burmese python explores their pool area with our large underwater viewing and discover all about the rarest of the macaques with our of lion-tailed macaque family.

In 2021, Our Wilds of Asia building was closed of to the pubic whilst we redeveloped the area, not only to enhance the visitor’s experience, but also to upgrade and redeveloped many species enclosures. You can find out more about the redevelopment work here.

You can learn more about the different species at Wilds of Asia by attending our daily encounters. View the timetable here.


Animals in Wilds of Asia

Giant Anteater (Myrmecophaga tridactyla)
Mammals

Giant Anteater (Myrmecophaga tridactyla)

Wilds of Asia

Area:
Central and South America
Status:
Vulnerable
Quick Fact:

When collecting insects, an anteater's tongue can flick up to 150 times per minute, eating up to 30,000 ants per day!

Anteaters are almost blind, but have a keen sense of smell.

Binturong (Arctictis binturong)
Mammals

Binturong (Arctictis binturong)

Wilds of Asia

Area:
South East Asia
Status:
Vulnerable
Quick Fact:

Binturongs mark their territory by leaving a musky substance that smells like popcorn! They are also known as the bear cat and is a member of the civet family.

Wreathed Hornbill (Rhyticeros undulatus)
Birds

Wreathed Hornbill (Rhyticeros undulatus)

Wilds of Asia

Area:
South-east Asia
Status:
Vulnerable
Quick Fact:

Wreathed hornbills are excellent seed dispersers. They fly great distances and can distribute the seeds via their droppings over large areas.

Asian Short-clawed Otter (Aonyx cinereus)
Mammals

Asian Short-clawed Otter (Aonyx cinereus)

Wilds of Asia

Area:
South-east Asia through to the Philippines
Status:
Vulnerable
Quick Fact:

Asian short-clawed otters are the smallest of all the species of otters. They use their hands to probe into mud or under rocks to find a tasty meal.

Emerald Tree Monitor (Varanus prasinus)
Reptiles

Emerald Tree Monitor (Varanus prasinus)

Wilds of Asia

Area:
New Guinea (Indonesia & Papua New Guinea) and adjacent islands
Status:
Least Concern
Quick Fact:

Emerald tree monitors are the only monitor lizard with a prehensile tail, which allows them to be highly arboreal.

Burmese Python (Python molurus bivittatus)
Reptiles

Burmese Python (Python molurus bivittatus)

Wilds of Asia

Area:
Southern Asia
Status:
Vulnerable
Quick Fact:

We have one male and one female Burmese pythons housed in the Wilds of Asia exhibit.

The Burmese python are capable of reaching 23 feet or more in length and can weigh up to 200 pounds!

Lion-Tailed Macaque (Macaca silenus)
Mammals

Lion-Tailed Macaque (Macaca silenus)

Wilds of Asia

Area:
The Ghat Mountains of south-west India.
Status:
Endangered
Quick Fact:

The lion-tailed macaque's name comes from its long tail, which has a tassel at the end like that of a lion. They are one of the smallest and most endangered of the macaque species of monkey.

Pileated Gibbon (Hylobates pileatus)
Mammals

Pileated Gibbon (Hylobates pileatus)

Wilds of Asia

Area:
Cambodia, Laos and south-east Thailand
Status:
Endangered
Quick Fact:

Pileated gibbons live in socially-monogamous pairs so the male and a female live together and rear their offspring together.

Red Panda (Ailurus fulgens)
Mammals

Red Panda (Ailurus fulgens)

Wilds of Asia

Area:
Himalayas, from Nepal to Assam
Status:
Endangered
Quick Fact:

Our breeding pair of red pandas are housed in an open air enclosure with a number of different platforms and plenty of space for them to climb and explore. The enclosure has plenty of bamboo for our individuals to enjoy, as this makes up 95% of their diet in the wild. Bamboo is highly nutritious and red pandas may spend up to 13 hours foraging for this food source as well as consuming 200,000 bamboo leaves a day.


Explore other enclosures:

Aardvark Burrow

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Australian Rainbows

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Bears of the Rising Sun

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Call of the Wild

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Canopy of South America

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Chimpanzee Lookout

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Colenso Village

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Dragons of Komodo

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Edge of Africa

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Elephant Kingdom

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Familiar Friends

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Feathers of the Forest

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Gelada Plateau

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Guinea Pig Village

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Iguana Forest

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Inca Trail

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Island Dwellers

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Kingdom of the Wild

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Koi Niwa

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Leopards at Ussuri Falls

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Lion Rock

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Lost Madagascar

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Meddelin Monkeys

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Otter Creek

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Out of Africa

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Playa Patagonia

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Rainforest Walkthrough

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Rajang's Forest

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Suricata Sands

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The Pig Patch

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Tiger Taiga

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Vulture Valley

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Walking Giants

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Wallaby Walkabout

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World of Wings

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Worlds Apart

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