Pygmy Hippopotamus (Choeropsis liberiensis)
Mammals

Pygmy Hippopotamus (Choeropsis liberiensis)

Kingdom of the Wild

Area:
Western Africa, Liberia, Ivory Coast, Sierra Leone.
Status:
Endangered and listed on Appendix II of CITES.
Quick Fact:

The pygmy hippopotamus spends the day in water, and emerges when they are hungry and will feed on fruits, leaves, roots and grasses

Maneless Zebra (Equus burchelli bohmi)
Mammals

Maneless Zebra (Equus burchelli bohmi)

Kingdom of the Wild

Area:
southern Sudan and southern Ethiopia, south along eastern Africa, as far as Zambia, Mozambique and Malawi, before spreading into most southern African countries.
Status:
Near Threatened
Quick Fact:

Each zebra has a unique stripe pattern that can be recognised by other family members!

Ostrich (Struthio camelus)
Birds

Ostrich (Struthio camelus)

Kingdom of the Wild

Area:
Africa, and has been introduced to southern Australia
Status:
Least concern
Quick Fact:

The ostrich is the only bird to have just 2 toes, one of which has a formidable 10 cm long claw!

African Crowned Crane (Balearica regulorum gibbericeps)
Birds

African Crowned Crane (Balearica regulorum gibbericeps)

Kingdom of the Wild

Area:
East Africa
Status:
Endangaered
Quick Fact:

The Crowned cranes are recognisable from the stiff golden feathers which is on the top of their head

Slender-snouted crocodile
Reptiles

Slender-snouted crocodile

Chimpanzee Lookout

Area:
Central and West Africa
Status:
Classified as Data Deficient (DD) by the IUCN Red List
Quick Fact:

It is the only crocodilian species known for being able to climb as high as several meters into the limbs of trees fallen along streams.

Black and white colobus monkeys
Mammals

Black and white colobus monkeys

Out of Africa

Area:
Central Africa
Status:
Classified as Vulnerable by the IUCN Red List
Quick Fact:

They are quite unusual in that they have lost their thumbs and generally have only four fingers on their hands. Some individuals will have a partial thumb that is not used.

L’hoest Monkey (Cercopithecus lhoesti)
Mammals

L’hoest Monkey (Cercopithecus lhoesti)

Edge of Africa

Area:
Republic of Congo, Western Uganda
Status:
Vulnerable
Quick Fact:

L'hoest monkeys have a white ruff that frames the face with distinctive deep set orange eyes. Their bodies are black and have long legs which are grizzled with grey. They have a chestnut coloured “saddle” at the base of their back.

Goats and Sheep
Mammals

Goats and Sheep

Familiar Friends

Area:
Africa
Status:
Not listed
Quick Fact:

Cameron Sheep have short, fine hair which allows them to keep cool in the African heat.

Pygmy goats are great climbers, browsing on leaves and young branches in the trees.

Hunting Dogs (Lycaon pictus)
Mammals

Hunting Dogs (Lycaon pictus)

Dragons of Komodo

Area:
Southern and Eastern Africa
Status:
Endangaered
Quick Fact:

Hunting dogs, also known as painted dogs each have their own unique coat pattern, with big round ears. Unlike other dogs hunting dogs only have only four toes per foot.

Hunting dogs are threatened by shrinking space to roam in their African home. They are also quite susceptible to diseases spread by domestic animals.

Horses and Donkeys
Mammals

Horses and Donkeys

Familiar Friends

Status:
Not listed
Quick Fact:

Here at Colchester Zoo we have a number of horses and donkeys that rotate from their stable to their field.

All of our horses are rescues from the World Horse Welfare who rehome horses with us who enjoy human interaction.

There are more than 300 breeds of horse developed for many different uses.

A male donkey is called a Jack, and a female is called a Jenny or Jennet.

Fennec Fox (Vulpes zerda)
Mammals

Fennec Fox (Vulpes zerda)

Lion Rock

Area:
Northern Africa
Status:
Least concern
Quick Fact:

A fully grown fennec fox only weighs around 1kg and they are the smallest of all the foxes.

The fennec fox's unusually large ears, which can be up to 15cm long, are an adaptation to help them lose heat in the hot desert and to help locate their prey.

Black and White Ruffed Lemur ( Varecia verigata variegata)
Mammals

Black and White Ruffed Lemur ( Varecia verigata variegata)

Lost Madagascar

Area:
Madagascar
Status:
Critically endangered
Quick Fact:

In groups, black and white ruffed lemurs produce a chorus of deep, barking, alarm calls, and a wailing howl when defending their territories.

Gelada Baboon (Theropithecus gelada)
Mammals

Gelada Baboon (Theropithecus gelada)

Gelada Bridge

Area:
Central Etheopia
Status:
Near Threatened
Quick Fact:

The gelada baboons are the last surviving species of grass-grazing primates, spending ,most of their time on the ground and rarely climbing trees.

Kirk’s Dik-Dik (Madoqua Kirkii)
Mammals

Kirk’s Dik-Dik (Madoqua Kirkii)

Edge of Africa

Area:
Eastern Africa
Status:
Least concern
Quick Fact:

The dik-dik is one of the smallest members of the antelope family measuring a maximum of 45cm high.

Blue Duiker (Philantomba monticola)
Mammals

Blue Duiker (Philantomba monticola)

Edge of Africa

Area:
Central, Eastern and Southern Africa
Status:
Least concern
Quick Fact:

The blue duiker gets its name from the bluish hairs on its back. Duiker is a Dutch Afrikaans word, meaning to dive, referring to the duiker’s tendency to dive into dense cover when startled.

Ruppell’s Griffon Vulture (Gyps rueppellii)
Birds

Ruppell’s Griffon Vulture (Gyps rueppellii)

Vulture Valley

Area:
Sub-Saharan Africa
Status:
Critically endangered
Quick Fact:

Vultures have bald heads to stop them getting dirty whilst eating!

Griffons can consume more than 3 pounds of meat in 4 to 5 minutes.

Reticulated Giraffe (Giraffa camelopardalis reticulata)
Mammals

Reticulated Giraffe (Giraffa camelopardalis reticulata)

Kingdom of the Wild

Area:
Northeastern Kenya
Status:
Least concern
Encounter:
12:15 & 14:15
Quick Fact:

With their 45-centimetre prehensile, black tongue the giraffe can eat up to 134 kilograms of leaves a day! We have a group of pure-bred reticulated giraffes, all females.

Don't miss the daily feed times where you can get the unique opportunity to hand feed the giraffes yourself!

Southern White Rhinoceros (Ceratotherium simum simum)
Mammals

Southern White Rhinoceros (Ceratotherium simum simum)

Kingdom of the Wild

Area:
South and northeast Africa
Status:
Near Threatened and listed on Apppendix I of CITES
Quick Fact:

The white rhinoceros is the largest of the five rhinoceros’ species and one of the world’s biggest land animals. We have a group of five White Rhinos; three females and two males. Our group of Rhinos are part of the ESB breeding programme

Colchester Zoo's charity, Action for the Wild supports rhino conservation in South Africa raising funds for the equipment need to protect both white and black rhinos.

Aardvark  (Orycteropus afer)
Mammals

Aardvark (Orycteropus afer)

Aardvark Burrows

Area:
Southern Egypt to South Africa
Status:
Least concern
Quick Fact:

Our group of aardvarks are one of the most successful breeding group of aardvarks in the UK with 9 offspring born since 2007!

As aardvarks are nocturnal you may not be able to spot them outside, so make sure to step inside the burrow to see the group curled up inside!

African Elephant (Loxodonta africana)
Mammals

African Elephant (Loxodonta africana)

Elephant Kingdom

Area:
Africa south of the Sahara
Status:
Vulnerable and listed on Appendix II on the Convention on Migratory Species (CMS or Bonn Convention). Listed in Appendix I of CITES in 1989, but the populations of the following Range States have since been transferred back to Appendix II: Botswana (1997), Namibia (1997), South Africa (2000) and Zimbabwe (1997)
Encounter:
12:30 & 14:30
Quick Fact:

The largest recorded African elephant weighed an impressive ten tonnes. The African elephant’s brain is bigger than that of any other animal with the skull making up 25% of its body weight.

Don't miss the daily feed times where you can get the unique opportunity to hand feed the elephants yourself!

African Lion (Panthera leo)
Big Cats

African Lion (Panthera leo)

Lion Rock

Area:
Africa, southern Sahara to South Africa
Status:
Vulnerable and listed on Appendix II of CITES
Encounter:
15:30
Quick Fact:

The lion has been characterised as fearsome, courageous and majestic, the lion’s strength and ferocity has earned it the title of ‘King of the Beasts’ in many cultures.

Cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus)
Big Cats

Cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus)

Edge of Africa

Area:
Northern and central Africa and small areas of the Middle East
Status:
Vulnerable and listed on Appendix I of CITES
Quick Fact:

The cheetah is the fastest land mammal on the planet, reaching speeds of up to 87 kilometres per hour.

Why not learn more about the cheetahs at their encounter?

Chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes)
Mammals

Chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes)

Chimpanzee Lookout

Area:
Guinea and Ghana in West Africa, across to Tanzania in the east
Status:
Endangered and listed on Appendix I of CITES
Encounter:
13:00 & 15:15
Quick Fact:

The chimpanzee is one of our closet living relatives and is estimated to share 98 percent of our genes.

Mandrill (Mandrillus sphinx)
Mammals

Mandrill (Mandrillus sphinx)

Edge of Africa

Area:
Western Africa including South Cameroon and Gabon
Status:
Vulnerable and listed on Appendix I of CITES.
Quick Fact:

The mandrill is not only the largest monkey in the world, but it is also one of the most distinctive, with their extremely striking face, with a red stripe down the nose and blue flanges framing it.

Our mandrill troop at Colchester Zoo have a very successful breeding record, with offspring born yearly.

 

Patas Monkey (Erythrocebus patas)
Mammals

Patas Monkey (Erythrocebus patas)

Out of Africa

Area:
Senegal, east to Ethiopia and south to Tanzania.
Status:
Least concern and listed on Appendix II of CITES.
Quick Fact:

Patas monkeys are one of the fastest primates in the world and can run at speeds of 50 kmph.

Red River Hog (Potamochoerus porcus)
Mammals

Red River Hog (Potamochoerus porcus)

Edge of Africa

Area:
West and central sub Saharan Africa to northern South Africa and Madagascar.
Status:
Least concern
Quick Fact:

Instantly recognisable for its bright rufous fur, the red river hog is undoubtedly the most strikingly coloured of all wild pigs

We have a group of red river hogs here at Colchester Zoo. These wild species of pig are also known as bushpigs. They have a bristly coat, which can vary from reddish to greyish-brown, and they have a white mane running down their backs. They also have 2 overgrown teeth which protrude out of their mouths as tusks.

Red-bellied Lemur (Eulemur rubriventer)
Mammals

Red-bellied Lemur (Eulemur rubriventer)

Lost Madagascar

Area:
Eastern Madagascar
Status:
Vulnerable and listed on Appendix I of CITES.
Quick Fact:

Red-bellied lemurs are cathemeral, which means they may be active during the day or night.

Our small group of red-bellied Lemurs can be seen in the Lost Madagascar exhibit, foraging for food and sunbathing!

Ring-tailed Lemur (Lemur catta)
Mammals

Ring-tailed Lemur (Lemur catta)

Lost Madagascar

Area:
South West Madagascar
Status:
Near Threatened and listed on Appendix I of CITES
Quick Fact:

We have a successful breeding group of Ring-tailed Lemurs that are part of an EEP breeding programme.

Male ring-tailed lemurs compete for females via ‘stink fights’, smearing scent on their tails and wafting the smell towards their opponent.

Slender Tailed Meerkat (Suricata suricata)
Mammals

Slender Tailed Meerkat (Suricata suricata)

Suricata Sands

Area:
Southern Africa including Angola, Namibia and South Africa
Status:
Least concern
Quick Fact:

Meerkats communicate by using a variety of calls to signal certain situations such as being lost, alarm calls, pup feeding calls, guarding calls and foraging calls.

Spotted Hyena (Crocuta crocuta)
Mammals

Spotted Hyena (Crocuta crocuta)

Edge of Africa

Area:
Found throughout sub-Saharan Africa with the exception of the Congo rainforests and the far south
Status:
Least concern
Encounter:
15:00
Quick Fact:

We have had previous successful births with our spotted hyena and hope to be able to help maintain the population of this species within the captive environment.

Warthog (Phacochoerus africanus)
Mammals

Warthog (Phacochoerus africanus)

Edge of Africa

Area:
Central, eastern and southern Africa, south of the Sahara desert.
Status:
Least concern
Quick Fact:

We have a group of warthogs living within their enclosure at Edge of Africa.

The warthog gets its name from the warts on its face and these warts help to protect the face and eyes from an opponent's tusks when fighting.

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