Patagonian Sea Lion (Otaria flavescens)
Mammals

Patagonian Sea Lion (Otaria flavescens)

Playa Patagonia

Area:
Coasts of South America.
Status:
Least concern
Encounter:
12.00, 14.00 & 15.30
Quick Fact:

Sealions use their fore and hind limbs for “walking” on the land and mainly use their front flippers for swimming.

Owl Butterfly (Caligo Memnom)
Insects

Owl Butterfly (Caligo Memnom)

Butterfly Glade

Area:
Central and South America
Status:
Least concern
Quick Fact:

The owl-like eye patterns on the wings of the owl butterfly are a type of camouflage known as mimicry. Other animals will avoid going near large eyes that resemble a predator, keeping the butterfly safe. They also prefer to fly at dawn and dusk in the dark forests of South America, and only ever travel small distances to avoid being spotted by flying predators. Their caterpillars are small and brown, and will camouflage against plant stems.

Green Anaconda ( Eunectes murinus)
Reptiles

Green Anaconda ( Eunectes murinus)

Worlds Apart

Area:
Northern and South America
Status:
Not listed
Quick Fact:

Female green anacondas are almost five times heavier than males.

Their huge size can make it difficult for them to move on land, however, in water they can move with stealth and ease.

Red-Bellied Piranha (Pygocentrus nattereri)
Under Water

Red-Bellied Piranha (Pygocentrus nattereri)

Worlds Apart

Area:
South America
Status:
Not listed
Quick Fact:

Red-bellied piranhas have a reputation for being ferocious predators, however their frenzied attacks are rare.

Pied Tamarin (Saguinus bicolor)
Mammals

Pied Tamarin (Saguinus bicolor)

Worlds Apart

Area:
South America
Status:
Endangaered
Quick Fact:

These small monkeys have a body length that ranges between 20-28 cm, a tail that measures between 33 and 42 cm and an average weight of 430 grams.

Tamarins are highly social and live in a family-like structure in the tropical forests

Linne’s two toed sloth (choloepus didactylus)
Mammals

Linne’s two toed sloth (choloepus didactylus)

Worlds Apart

Area:
Central and South America
Status:
Least concern
Quick Fact:

Sloths are one of the slowest animals in the world, as their leafy diet doesn't provide much energy!

Sloths spend most of their time hanging upside down in the forest canopy.

Golden-Headed Lion Tamarin ( Leontopithecus chrysolmlas)
Mammals

Golden-Headed Lion Tamarin ( Leontopithecus chrysolmlas)

Worlds Apart

Area:
Brazil
Status:
Endangaered
Quick Fact:

Golden-headed lion tamarins stick their tongues out at intruders to scare them away.

Coppery Titi Monkey (Callicebus cupreus)
Mammals

Coppery Titi Monkey (Callicebus cupreus)

Worlds Apart

Area:
Brazil and Peru
Status:
Least concern
Quick Fact:

Coppery Titi monkeys intertwine they're tails when their sleeping.

Geoffroy’s Marmoset (Callithrix geoffroyi)
Mammals

Geoffroy’s Marmoset (Callithrix geoffroyi)

Worlds Apart

Area:
Brazil
Status:
Least concern
Quick Fact:

Marmosets have adapted incisor teeth for carving holes in tree trunks to get sap and gum.

Southern Tamandua (Tamandua tetradactyla)
Mammals

Southern Tamandua (Tamandua tetradactyla)

Worlds Apart

Area:
South America
Status:
Least concern
Quick Fact:

Tamanduas are known as "stinkers of the forest" by local people due to the fact the leave scent trails to mark their territory!

Tamanduas have a 40cm long, sticky tongue which is perfect for licking up ants and termites.

Giant Anteater (Myrmecophaga tridactyla)
Mammals

Giant Anteater (Myrmecophaga tridactyla)

Wilds of Asia

Area:
Central and South America
Status:
Vulnerable
Quick Fact:

When collecting insects, an anteater's tongue can flick up to 150 times per minute, eating up to 30,000 ants per day!

Anteaters are almost blind, but have a keen sense of smell.

Chilean Flamingos (Phoenicopterus Chilensis)
Birds

Chilean Flamingos (Phoenicopterus Chilensis)

Otter Creek

Area:
South America
Status:
Near Threatened
Quick Fact:

Flamingos have bristtle-like tongues to filter water and food.

Their pink feathers come from the pigments in their diet.

Andean Condor (Vultur gryphus)
Birds

Andean Condor (Vultur gryphus)

World of Wings

Area:
The high Andes and the shores of the Peruvian coast
Status:
Near threatened, listed on Appendix I of CITES and listed on Appendix II of the Convention on Migratory Species (CMS)
Quick Fact:

As one of the largest flying birds in the world, as it soars gracefully on huge, motionless wings.

Like many birds of prey they spend a lot of time soaring around searching for food. If one condor drops to the ground after spotting a carcass others will follow to investigate, leading to old beliefs that the birds were telepathic.

Humboldt Penguin (Spheniscus humboldti)
Birds

Humboldt Penguin (Spheniscus humboldti)

Penguin Shores

Area:
Peru and Chile and islands off the west coast of South America
Status:
Vulnerable, listed on Appendix I of CITES
Encounter:
11:30 & 15:00
Quick Fact:

Humboldt Penguins are monogamous, meaning they only have one partner through their breeding life.

All of the penguins have individual patterns of spots on their chest and their own characters, they are also tagged for identification.

Penguin encounters take place at Inca Trail.

See what penguins you can identify during your next visit!

King Vulture (Sarcoramphus papa)
Birds

King Vulture (Sarcoramphus papa)

World of Wings

Area:
Central America, south as far as southern Brazil
Status:
Least concern and listed on Appendix III of CITES
Quick Fact:

Like most vultures, king vultures have a bald head to stop any feathers getting dirty whilst they are eating which also prevents a build up of bacteria.

King vultures are believed to mate for live, which can be around 30 years in the wild.

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